The Thérèse de Blainville PD warns of “grandparents scam”.

The RIPTB is warning citizens on its territory of the grandparents scam. This is not something new and is rampant all over the world.

It is sometimes difficult to detect certain forms of fraud, especially when dishonest people hide under the false identity of members of your family. It is on this bond of trust that some fraudsters rely in order to extort funds from their unsuspecting victims.

According to the police here is a typical conversation that should set off alarm bells:

– Hello, grandma. It’s your favorite talking.

– John? Alexander?

– Yes, it’s Alexander. Listen to grandma, I’m in trouble …

The pseudo-Alexander then informs his “grandmother” that he has just had an accident in which he injured people, that he is being held at the police station and that he must post a bail of several thousand dollars to be released. He asks her to advance the money to him immediately and give him his credit card number. He also promises to reimburse her as soon as he gets out of this mess.

A similar situation arose in the Thérèse de Blainville territory. Fortunately, when “granny” came to the bank, her nervousness and the unusual amount of her withdrawal alerted the staff who quickly contacted the police!

Tips to outsmart fraudsters:

Have them call you back in 10 minutes. This will allow you to take the time to check with another family member. Even if you have been convinced not to tell anyone, it is always prudent to seek validation from people you trust in your entourage.

On the phone, always refuse to give your credit card number to someone you haven’t contacted yourself. Don’t be afraid to hang up if the person insists. If you believe you are the victim of fraud, file a complaint with the police! 9-1-1   

Do not hesitate to contact a loved one or ask for help if you would like more information about the support and tools available in the event of fraud.